Review- Psycho Pass Premium Edition: Law and Evil

ItemDescription

Psycho Pass is a 2012 series helmed by Production I.G. who has brought us series such as Ghost in the Shell and written by industry superstar Gen Urobuchi who brought us the masterpiece Madoka Magica. The show has pretty solid production values though the animation falters here and there and the soundtrack for the show is pretty memorable as are it’s two opening themes Abnormalize and Out of Control (the latter of which has surprisingly good english). I first saw the series simulcasted during it’s run in 2012 and thoroughly enjoyed the series. I’m happy to say that I enjoyed the series even more in my second viewing of it than in the initial run as seeing the whole picture allows for a bit more clarity on certain aspects of the story’s themes.

The storyline centers around a future where people are judged by a creation known as the Sybil System which can read people’s minds and determine if they have the mentality of a potential criminal or not. Once judged a potential criminal, a person becomes an outcast destined to either be imprisoned or executed. To track down actual criminals, the law enforcement of the series decides to use people who have been deemed as potential criminals to hunt them down and  bring them to justice. The first half of the series slowly explores this world and its characters as we’re introduced to various cases with different motivations and each discussing certain themes about society at large and how those themes affect individuals. One particular case involving a criminal who killed people whose online avatars were famous and then assumed to take their online identities and flawlessly imitate them asks the question of whether or not the internet brings people closer together or further apart and this is just one of the many questions the series asks in its run.

The second half of the show is more  centralized in its themes as it specifically questions the concept of law and order in general through dealing with criminal mastermind Makishima(who also happens to be behind most of what happens in the first half as well). The characters are forced to choose between protecting the law itself and exacting justice and the show eventually questions whether or not the law is truly capable of protecting people. The ending to this conflict plays out surprisingly realistically and though its grounded in cynicism it also provides a slight nudge of hope that society may eventually get to the point where people can someday live up to the ideals that the law embodies.

The series is in many ways like its leading female character Akane. The good and evil of every concept it observes is looked at in great detail and it comes to understand how to accept them for what they are. Though the show doesn’t hesitate to show how evil the Sybil System is (and it’s true nature is quite disturbing) it also demonstrates that simply removing it won’t make society better and it’s existance is one that people have come to depend on. Similarly though Makishima’s views are mostly shown to be correct the show is also quick to note the evils behind his actions as well. It maintains a cynical yet neutral stance on things and its intent is more to open ones views on its subjects rather than directly challenge them.

The characters of the show help to lay out the show’s stance as we see Akane slowly change her viewpoint over the course of the series from an idealist to a well intentioned cynic.  Some of the other cast members are also pretty strong as we have the male lead Kogami whose conflict between the law and his personal sense of justice drives the final confrontation along with Ginoza and Toyomi whose respective character arcs play off each other and ends up leading down a similar path. The main villain Makishima is also a bit of a show stealer as you can occasionally find yourself agreeing with his arguments even though he’s clearly a sociopath.

The show does have it’s issues though as two of the central characters in the series Yayoi and Shion don’t actually come across as being terribly important despite having an entire episode devoted to the former’s backstory and their largely left in the background. The series can also occasionally get a bit too over the top in terms of its graphic content  and can sometimes seem as though it’s trying too hard.

Despite my initial skepticism over Zac Bolton directing it, Funimation’s english dub for the series delivers a series of solid and strong performances across the board. Long time veteran, Robert McCollum brings just the right amount of grit for Kogami and Kate Oxley successfully captures Akane’s progression from a naive rookie into a hardened detective. Newcomer, Alex Organ  also delivers pretty strongly as Makishima and though he initially starts off a little rough around the edges compared to his seiyuu counterpart Takahiro Sakurai, he grows into the role very quickly and delivers a satisfying performance.

The release itself is also pretty nice. The box the set comes is good looking though not perfect material and some of the extras include the soundtrack CDs for the show and interviews with some of the creative staff behind the series at Sakura-Con which can provide a little bit of insight as to what their intentions for the series actually were.

Though the show isn’t quite perfect it juggles the themes it covers very well and it knows how to address thinking of them without directly challenging your view on them and it understands how to accept them for what they are. I highly recommend checking it out.

Overall: 9.2/10

Available through RightStuf, Funimation.com, Amazon and Robert’s Anime Corner Store

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *