Toon Talk- Monthly Retrospective (October 2016)

We’ve finally hit November and this long year is finally starting to wind down. October saw the start of a new season and with it some new shows as well as some new highlights so let’s take a brief look at some of what happened last month.


New Season, New Anime

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The beginning of October marked the start of the Fall 2016 anime season, which means a ton of new shows have come out over the last few weeks. I already went over my first impressions of a lot of these shows earlier so I won’t go into too much detail on individual stuff again, but I will say that despite some of the reservations I brought up while I was doing those (and nearly burning myself out in the process) it’s actually looking to be a pretty strong season. There’s a lot of chaff as always but stuff like Izetta: The Last Witch and Flip Flappers have stayed consistent enough that I’m fairly confident they’ll make for a fun ride the whole way through, and while Yuri on Ice already seemed like it was easily going to be the best show of the season, it’s only improved since it’s first episode, and to my amazement it seems to actually be popular. It’s certainly nice to see something that doesn’t scream super-mainstream actually picking up steam (and weirdly not many people seem to be actively talking about Drifters despite that being the obvious big action title of the season) and I guess it’s another sign that times are changing. Time will tell if the bigger Fall titles manage to stick the landing in the end but now that I’ve got the amount of shows on my plate down to a manageable number, I’m certainly pleased with what I’m seeing so far.

 

Toei FINALLY Brings Dragonball Super to the States

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So it’s finally happened. After over a year of being denied Dragonball Super despite DBZ being about as mainstream as anime can get when it comes to the U.S., Toei’s finally decided to wisen up and bring the show to legal streaming channels ala Crunchyroll and Daisuki. All I can say is: it’s about time, and while it’s easy to speculate over what the hold up was (knowing Toei I imagine it was them trying to push for television deals first) at this point I’m just glad it’s been made available. As of right now I have yet to actually check out Super since I have a ton of other things on my plate to shift through, but I’ve heard a lot of good things about it from both enthusiastic and jaded Dragonball fans alike, and I’m looking forward to taking a peek at it whenever I get the chance.

 

Shelter and the “Anime” Debacle

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One of the most interesting and simultaneously irritating discussions of the month came when a short music video called Shelter was uploaded to Crunchyroll. It looked absolutely gorgeous, and was helmed by some of the folks at A-1 Pictures, but despite that listing, having a Japanese voice actress attached to it, and being having some marketing in Japan, the fact that it was partially produced by American musician, Porter Robinson was enough for the mods at Reddit’s anime forums to declare it “not-anime” and similar debacles were brought up elsewhere. Honestly I have to say that it’s really frustrating to still be having this conversation in 2016, but apparently some parts of the anime fandom haven’t moved past gatekeeping culture, and the whole thing has gotten to be tiresome. I’ve made my stance on the whole east v.s. west thing and what exactly defines “anime” pretty clear, so I’m not going to go into too much of a tirade on that, but as far as I’m concerned if it was animated in Japan, features Japanese voice talent and was marketed for Japanese audiences in some capacity: it’s anime and arguing otherwise is kind of nonsensical.

Co-productions have been a thing for years now, and with the ever increasing influence of the western market and China on anime sales they’re only going to grow in number and it’s time for folks to start getting with the program. It’s fine to debate over exactly how much good or ill western influences might have on what gets produced, but arguing their validity is inherently pointless when you take into account how fragile the west’s definition of “anime” is, and the time people spend arguing over this stuff, is time taken away from actually evaluating the works themselves, and for what it’s worth, Shelter was pretty good, and the overall reception seems to have been positive. Sadly I don’t imagine this’ll be the last time these kinds of debates pop up, and all the more considering stuff like Children of Ether is coming down the pipeline, but I do wish certain sections of the anime fandom would give it a rest already.


And that’s it for this time. This one was kind of short despite October being a fairly big month, but I mostly just wanted to get my thoughts out on the Shelter thing (and to be frank I almost forgot about doing this entirely). Hopefully I’ll have a bit more to talk about next time but until then, stay animated.

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