Review: Voltron Legendary Defender Season 2- Building on Success

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Synopsis: Long ago the leader of the Galra race, Emperor Zarkon began his conquest of the universe, and the extermination of the Alteans. The only force capable of stopping him was a weapon known as Voltron, but it was sealed away along with the Altean princess, Allura. 10,000 years later, a group of young space pilots from Earth stumble upon one of the robot lions that form Voltron, along with Allura but soon discover that Zarkon is still alive, and has already seized control over most of the known universe. Now these pilots must become the new Paladins of Voltron and use it’s power to defeat Zarkon once and for all.

The Review

At this point it more or less goes without saying that the first season of Voltron: Legendary Defender was a massive success. It managed to pull off the extremely difficult task of being both appealing to the nostalgia of the old fans while, creating a lot of new ones, and it’s brought the franchise the most amount of buzz and popularity it’s seen since the 80’s with the original series. Of course with all that success also comes the risk of things potentially falling apart at the seams, and given how badly the staff’s previous series The Legend of Korra ended up imploding on itself, I have to admit I was bit afraid of this potentially suffering the same fate. So with all that on it’s plate, does this season do a great job of living up to the first?

Fortunately the answer is a resounding, yes. The season kicks off, pretty much exactly where the last one ended, and despite the roughly 6-month gap, it feels like the show never really left. The strong mix of action and comedy that made a lot of the show’s first season work is still in full effect here, and the chemistry between the paladins remains as strong as ever. None of this should be too surprising since, production-wise, this second season was originally meant to just be the back half of the first, but I’ve seen plenty of similarly produced shows where that approach backfired, so I’m glad to say that this series is still as fun as ever.

Of course, while the second season manages to maintain pretty much all of what made the first work, it also manages to throw in a few welcome improvements. One of my biggest issues with the first season, was the Galra felt a little too one-note as antagonists, and were vastly in need of some fleshing out to keep from come across as too generic. This is largely addressed here in the form of introducing a rebel Galra cell working against the empire, which helps to add some much needed shades of grey to the overall conflict, while giving the second season a slightly heavier tone than the first. It also helps in making the stakes of the season a lot higher, as much of it is spent building up to a big confrontation with Zarkon himself. Although while it’s obviously way too early in the show’s run for that to actually go as planned, it manages to throw in a few good curve-balls (especially regarding the fate of a certain character), and the season finale is about as wonderfully climatic as giant robot shows get.

Though while this story stuff is all well and good, the real appeal of Voltron lies in it’s fun characters, and this season manages to outshine the first in that area too. As much as the first season did a great job of making all of the Paladins endearing, Keith in particular felt like a bit too much of a blank slate for his supposed importance to the story, especially given that he’s known as the protagonist in all the other franchise incarnations. Thankfully he’s given a lot more to work with here, and a fair chunk of the season is spent both exploring his origins, and setting him up for a future leadership role, helping to turn his character around significantly. Allura also benefits from a bit more focus as her hatred for the Galra clashes pretty heavily with the need for an alliance with the Galra rebels, and both Allura and Keith’s respective character arcs end up tying pretty heavily into the season’s larger conflicts.

The animation, also manages to step things up from the first season as the animators from Studio Mir continue to go all out in their homage to the “sakuga” style of Japanese animation. There’s a ton of really fantastic action sequences sprinkled throughout the season, making for some surprisingly intense fights, and the 3DCG for the robots still does a great job of mixing well with the show’s 2D animation, for some solid mecha battles. The final showdown of the season in particular is really something to behold, and stands as some of the best action choreography I’ve seen from the mecha genre in quite a while.

There was a lot for Voltron’s second season to live up to, and I’m happy to report that this one managed to be even stronger than the first. Everything from the stakes, to the character writing is doubled down here, and it all results in a fun ride from start to finish. This isn’t to say that there aren’t a few hiccups, as much like the first season the comedy can some times be hit or miss, and it does occasionally cut a bit too much into the serious aspects, but for the most part these are minor gripes, and nothing that’s really manages to slow down the show’s momentum. All in all, the second season does pretty much exactly what it needs to in terms of building on the first, while sticking to what made it work, and given that it more or less ends on the same type of obnoxious cliffhanger, I’m certainly going to be on the lookout for a third.

Overall: 8.9/10

First Impressions- Winter 2017 Anime (Part 2)

It’s time for round 2 of the winter anime season. I’ve already burned my way through a few things, but there’s still plenty more to go through, and a lot more potential suffering to be had so let’s get to it

Ratings Scale

Bad: Stay away far away from this one.  Not worth watching

Decent: Has some okay elements to it. Might be worth giving a  couple of episodes to see how it goes

Good: Fairly solid show. Should be worth keeping up with for now

Great: Really good show. Definently worth seeing if you get the chance

Excellent: Really outstanding show. Absolutely worth following .

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elDlive

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Synopsis: “Mumbling” Chuta Kokonose doesn’t have many friends. In fact, the only conversations he has anymore are with voices inside his head. Little does he know that this voice doesn’t mean he’s crazy. It just means he has an alien living inside his body!

First Impressions: Once upon a time I was a huge fan of Reborn, and while the final parts of the manga soured things for me, I still feel enough fondness for it, that I’d be more or less willing to check out anything else Akira Amano put ot. That’s where this series comes in, and having set my expectation levels somewhere around moderate, I more or less got what I figured I would here. There’s nothing particularly standout about the storytelling here as it’s all pretty by-the-numbers but mostly entertaining, and the tone hearken’s back more towards Amano’s gag series routes than the action heavy material from the later parts of Reborn, although that could certainly change given Chuuta clearly has some sort of ominous backstory. The one major feather in it’s cap though is some solid visual direction as the show has some really nice scene transitions, and while the color pallette isn’t exactly mindblowing, it feels lively enough to match what this is going for. I was pretty much going to watch this one either way, but for right now it seems like a moderately good way to spend Sunday afternoons

Rating: Good

 

Idol Incidents

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Synopsis: The story is set in a parallel Japan very similar to the modern Japan we known today. Increasing income divide, creeping environmental pollution, unsolvable garbage problems, childcare waiting lists being disputed while those directly involved aren’t present, repeated cases of corruption… Japan’s government, entrenched in its own vested interests, can do nothing about the abundant problems and discontent throughout the land. Now, at long last, idols are taking a stand to rescue a nation with no way out! The Heroine Party, the Sunlight Party, the Starlight Party, the Bishoujo Party, the Wakaba Party, the Subculture New Party, and the SOS Party: idols from these seven idol political parties who have become Diet members representing each prefecture will crash through the sense of stagnation that surrounds Japan with their song and dance! They will bring back the people’s smiles and envelop Japan in their shining aura!

First Impressions: From high strung comedies to action shows, idol shows have been inserted into just about everything at this point, so idols fusing together with politics was pretty much just a matter of time. On paper this sounds like a wonderfully dumb premise as it seems like something that could generate a lot of comedic mileage. In execution however, it’s a pretty standard idol show, and the politics hook just comes off more as awkward than funny. From the characters, to the tone, everything feels too safe and cookie-cutter for how potentially funny it could have been and while it’s not exactly short on visual gags, it really needed to be executed in a manner as over-the-top as possible to really work. There’s hints of that towards the end as we get a Love Live esque musical number towards the end, but it’s enough to elevate the rest of it, and nothing here really grabbed me. Still it’s an idol show and a fairly harmless looking one so if you’re into that sort of thing this might work out for you, but I’ll probably end up skipping this one unless I’m really starved for Sunday shows.

Rating: Decent

 

Gabriel Dropout

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Synopsis: An angel at the top of an angel school has descended to the human world! However, she has already acclimated to the life of the human world so much that she ends up leading a self-indulgent life, skipping school all the time and being absorbed in online games. Gabriel soon forgets about her original goal to make human beings happy and has turned into a lazy and hopeless angel, or a “sloppy angel” in short. Amazingly, she swears to continue to fully enjoy the pleasure of various entertainments of the human world.

First Impressions: I wasn’t originally planning to watch this one originally, but today was light on premieres so I figured I’d give it a shot. This turned out to be a pretty wise decision on my part, as this one actually turned out to be rather enjoyable. Anime having fun with classical archangels and archedemons isn’t a particularly new thing as we got The Devil is a Part Timer a couple of years back, and while this certainly doesn’t seem like it’ll be nearly as clever as that, it’s seems like another okay take at the concept. Archangel Gabriel turning into a NEET seems like kind of a weird thing, but having her be the snarky one seems rather appropriate, and I got a few laughs out of Satan being a chunni since that seems like a gag that’s a lot truer to form (not sure what’s up with Raphiel being a sadist, but I don’t recall everything about the Archangels so it’s possible there’s something in the stories to go along with the joke). Nothing here was too mindblowing, but it certainly made me laugh more than some of the other “comedy” premieres I’ve sat through this season so that counts for something. For now this seems like a solid watch, and I’m curious to see how much mileage it can get out of it’s premise (I’d certainly be curious to see what it’s versions of Micheal and Lucifer are like)

Rating: Good

 

ACCA: 13-Territory Inspection Department

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Synopsis: “ACCA” is a giant unified syndicate residing in a kingdom split into 13 autonomous regions. ACCA was formed back when there was threat of a coup d’etat, and it has continued to protect the peace of civilians for almost one hundred years. Jean Otus, the vice-chairman of the inspections department at ACCA headquarters, is one of the most cunning men in the syndicate’s history with the nickname “Jean the Cigarette Peddler.” Whimsically puffing his cigarettes, he wanders through the 13 districts, checking to see if there is any foul play afoot. Meanwhile, Jean is monitored by gazes, threatening rumors, and… snack time. Jean’s quiet everyday life slowly gets swallowed up into the world’s conspiracies!

First Impressions: As the director responsible for bringing us Space Dandy and One-Punch Man, Shingo Natsume has made quite a name for himself in the last couple of years. Given that this series is carrying over some of the staff from the latter, that made this one a potential darkhorse for the season and one that I was pretty eager to check out. However if like me, you were coming into this expecting a sakuga-fest ala Natsume’s previous titles, this…definently isn’t that. Instead what we get here is a somewhat low-key spy show ala last year’s Joker Game, and much of this first episode is spent giving us a rough idea of the protagonist’s personality and setting up the various procedural work that’s to be expected in this kind of show. Unfortunently that means this is pretty lacking in the excitment department, but at the same time this premiere doesn’t make much in the way of any notable mistakes, and exhumes just enough confidence and style to work as a competent genre piece. The last few minutes of the episode suggest things might get more thriller-esque later on, but I’m not exactly holding my breath on that, and it feels like it’ll probably keep things more on the slow, methodical side. All that said, this show’s genre is one that I’m usually pretty happy with, and while I wasn’t exactly thrilled by what I watched, I was certainly intrigued, so for now I’m willing to see where this goes.

Rating: Good

 

Hand Shakers

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Synopsis: Tazuna is a high school student, living in Osaka, who loves to fiddle around with machines. One day, he receives a repair request from an university laboratory. He accepts the request and ends up meeting a girl named Koyori, who has been bedridden for a very long time. Suddenly, Tazuna and Koyori get pulled into a whole different world called “Ziggurat”. In this world, there are Hand Shakers, two people who touch hands and create the Nimrod. Their goal is to defeat other Hand Shakers in order to gain an audience with “God”, who will grant them wishes. Protect with your own Hands!

First Impressions: So out of the new shows this season, this was one of the ones I was the most curious about. While GoHands’s previous series, K: The Animation, was a pretty big exercise in style over substance, I enjoyed it’s first season quite a bit, and figured that a series by mostly the same people could at least be fairly entertaining. Sadly though, it turns out that this show is bad. Like REALLY bad. So much so that I was getting PTSD flashbacks to last winter’s Divine Gate, and that’s something I never wanted to experience again. Much of the episode is spent as one big “how we got here” moment in an attempt to add clarity to it’s super awkward opening scene but somehow manages to come out as even more confusing by the end of it. About all the show really manages to establish is that the protagonist has some weird obsession with fixing things, and that he has some sad backstory involving his dead sister that’s now being projected onto some white-haired loli. Aside from that, most of the episode is just one big overly-long fight scene and it feels like an absolute mess.  The minimal explanation wouldn’t be too much of a deal breaker normally, as K’s first episode was pretty similar in that respect, but it’s script was just grounded enough to follow, where as this is all over the place.

Further adding to the show’s sins is that it’s also horrendously ugly. GoHands’s weird obsession with bright filters has always looked a little jarring, but this show looks like a spectacularly technicolor-ed mess, and the “dynamic” camera angles that are clearly meant to make the action look more bombastic just come off as obnoxious (the hefty amount of 3DCG doesn’t help either). To make matters even worse, said camera angles are also used rather skeevisly for boob jiggle fanservice, which comes off as downright gross in regards to one of the female characters who spends every scene being abused in a way that’s clearly supposed to be “sexy”. Pretty much everything about this is one big NOPE, and while I certainly wasn’t going to be surprised if this one ended up being a stinker (K’s second season was kind of a letdown), I sure wasn’t expecting anything this horrible, and of all the bad things I’ve sat through so far this season, this one’s easily the worst. Stay far, far away from this one.

Rating: BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADDDDD

 

Miss Kobayashi’s Dragon Maid

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Synopsis: Miss Kobayashi is your average office worker who lives a boring life, alone in her small apartment–until she saves the life of a female dragon in distress. The dragon, named Tohru, has the ability to magically transform into an adorable human girl (albeit with horns and a long tail!), who will do anything to pay off her debt of gratitude, whether Miss Kobayashi likes it or not. With a very persistent and amorous dragon as a roommate, nothing comes easy, and Miss Kobayashi’s normal life is about to go off the deep end!

First Impressions: Kyoto Animation is synonimous with high quality productions and solid content, but every now and then they tend to dip into the anime well and put out a low-key light novel adaption that ends up with better production values than it probably deserves. This season that distinction goes to Dragon Maid, which is an odd but mostly un-funny comedy about a lesbian dragon maid who decides to work for an office lady after the latter invites her over in drunken stupor. What ensues is a solid 23 minutes of gross out humor, boob jokes and lots of over-excited yelling, none of which managed to get a giggle out of me the entire time. My standards for anime comedies usually aren’t too high, but nothing about this one clicked with me, and I spent half the episode waiting for it to be over. Since this is a KyoAni show, it pretty much goes without saying that it looks good, and there’s some nice stuff on display here from the how the maid girl’s dragon form is animated, to some of the visual gags, but none of it’s really enough to change the fact that the comedy didn’t work for me and nothing about it left me curious for more. Of course everyone’s taste in comedies are different so maybe this one will work out well for other folks, and I don’t want to be too hard it since it’s not as though it’s attempting to be anything more than a low-end comedy, but this one’s a definite skip for me.

Rating: Bad

 

Chaos;Child

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Synopsis: Shibuya, 2015. In a city recovering from the “Shibuya Earthquake” which devastated it six years ago, Takuru Miyashiro, a student at the newly built private high school “Hekiho Academy” investigates a series of serial killings known as “The Return of the New Generation Madness” as part of his work for the school’s newspaper club…

First Impressions: Looks like it’s time for yet another semi-colon show, and unlike Occultic;Nine which was apparently just a light-novel adaptation, this one’s the real deal. It also happens to be a sequel to Chaos;Head which was the first of these to come out and easily the weakest of the bunch. This is supposedly due more to poor choices made by the adaption than anything else, but it still left something of a bitter taste in my mouth, so you can probably imagine my annoyance when the first 20 minutes of this 47 minute long premiere turned out to be a literal recap of Chaos;Head. Unfortunently the new material here hasn’t done much to engage me either, as none of the main characters really do too much to make themselves endearing here, with the focus instead being almost entirely on the mystery that the show’s setting up. Nothing about said mystery really did too much to make me feel like it was worth sticking around for, but offers just enough suspense to keep things from getting boring. For all these complaints though, it’s far from the worst thing I’ve had to sit through while going down the list of winter premieres, and none of it’s choices have struck me as particularly awful so far. In a stronger season I’d probably give this one the boot, but since there’s nothing else really competing for it’s attention on Thursdays, I may give it a couple more episodes and see if things improve.

Rating: Decent


And that’s it for me and the winter season. There’s still a couple of small premieres left and a few things I didn’t cover, but none of them seem like things that would appeal to me so this is probably as good a cut off point as any. By this point I’m used to jumping the gun on declaring a season to be weak, only to later eat my words and find enough enjoyable stuff to get by, but for the first time in a while I feel confident enough to say with absolute certainty that this is a really weak season. Usually I can find at least one or two non-sequels that feel compelling but so far the sequels (which I didn’t cover here since I felt they’d be redundant this time around) really are the best this season has to offer. Surprisingly though I don’t feel as frustrated by this as I’d expect since not having too much stuff to keep up with means I can finally tackle more of my massive backlog pile, but weak seasons tend to affect everyone, including the industry so in that respect it’s disappointing. At any rate I’m pretty much done here, and until next season, stay animated.

 

First Impressions- Winter 2017 Anime (Part 1)

It’s the start of a new year, which also means it’s the start of a new anime season. Outside of a handful of sequels, I’m more or less going into this season blind, so hopefully I’ll be able to find a few gems worth keeping up with. Of course it’s far more likely I’ll have to burn my way through some stinkers first so without any further ado, let’s get started.

Ratings Scale

Bad: Stay away far away from this one.  Not worth watching

Decent: Has some okay elements to it. Might be worth giving a  couple of episodes to see how it goes

Good: Fairly solid show. Should be worth keeping up with for now

Great: Really good show. Definently worth seeing if you get the chance

Excellent: Really outstanding show. Absolutely worth following .


Akiba’s Trip: The Animation

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Synopsis: Based off the hit game comes a new series about the danger lurking in the Otaku heaven of Akihabara. Vampires with an ability to take over anyone they bite seek their prey  in this anime fan’s paradise. When Tamotsu Denkigai encounters one, he nearly loses his life until the mysterious Matome Mayonaka revives him! Now part vampire, he forms a group to protect the streets of Akiba. fighting to keep the streets safe.

First Impressions: The only thing I knew about this one coming in was that it was being done by GONZO, who’s gone through some rather strange transformations since their bankrupcy a few years back and that it apparently had something of a lewd premise. Having watched the first episode, the latter is certainly…a thing, but my main form of curiosity came from the fact that it’s the first literal simuldub we’ve gotten since Space Dandy, and was made available less than an hour after the JP broadcast. Fortunently it doesn’t sound as rushed as that would imply, and everything here was perfectly servicable, if not great. As for the show itself, I find myself feeling rather mixed. Everything about it’s premise seems like it would be my kind of stupid, but there’s also a bit of a “self-aware” otaku edge to it, that feels slightly off putting to me, almost as though the show is trying to have it’s cake and eat it too. Of course that kind of thing can work for me (I enjoyed No Game No Life despite it’s various problems) but it usually has to feel completely over the top in all aspects and this felt a bit lacking. Still it certainly wasn’t boring, and it’s got some really fun animation so between that and the fact that it’s dub being available right off the bat meaning I don’t have to devote too much focus, I can probably be inclined to give it a couple more episodes.

Rating: Decent

Masamune-kun’s Revenge

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Synopsis: As an overweight child, Makabe Masamune was mercilessly teased and bullied by one particular girl, Adagaki Aki. Determined to one day exact his revenge upon her, Makabe begins a rigorous regimen of self-improvement and personal transformation. Years later, Masamune re-emerges as a new man. Handsome, popular, with perfect grades and good at sports, Masamune-kun transfers to Aki’s school, and is unrecognizable to her. Now, Masamune-kun is ready to confront the girl who bullied him so many years ago and humiliate her at last. But will revenge be as sweet as he thought?

First Impressions: So going off the premise alone, this show seemed like it would be a bit too mean spirited for my blood, and the first episode more or less cemented those fears. Fat shaming in and off itself is a tired trope and one that anime never does particular well and this pretty much continues the trend. Neither the heroine or the protagonist come off as endearing in any respect since the former is basically a jerk and the latter is just faking any form of kindness. The fact that we’re supposed to on some level, root for him giving her comeuppance by crushing her feelings just makes it all the worse, and while it’ll obviously go through a more traditional romance route at some point, there really isn’t anything here to convince me it’s worth sticking around to see how that turns out. Mean spirited comedies only ever really work if said meanness can also be pointed towards itself, and this seems way too self-indulgent for that so I’m not sure what the appeal here is supposed to be. I guess if you’re just attracted to rom-coms in general, something here might click with you, but for me it’s a total pass.

Rating: Bad

 

Saga of Tanya the Evil

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Synopsis: It is June of the year CE 1923. A young girl with blond hair and blue eyes, Tanya Degurechaff, has entered the final curriculum of the Imperial Military Academy and is training at the third patrol line in the northern military district, the Norden Theater, as part of her service to the force. Her training, the first step toward a brilliant career as an aviation mage, should have gone off without a hitch… but things took an unexpected turn.

First Impressions: This was another series that I was aware of soley by it’s absurd premise, but unlike Masamune-kun this one seemed like it had the potential to be entertaining. The first episode is pretty much a solid achievement in that respect as it does a solid job of establishing itself as a war drama with fantasy elements. Those fantasy elements in particular get some time to in the premiere, and I really like its sense of presentation. This is the first series helmed by the bizarrely named Studio NUT but aside from some awkward CG in the beginning, you’d never know it, as it’s a strong looking production, and there’s some solid combat sequences thrown into mix. As for the story itself though, it feels very much reminscent of last season’s Izetta: The Last Witch and while that one also had a pretty solid start it eventually devolved when the writer’s usual bad habits sunk in. This is a somewhat edgier take on that setting, so between that and our protagonist being rather…twisted it’s hard to say whether or not it’ll suffer the same fate (though I suppose if we can avoid having Tanya and her subordinate getting into wacky fanservice hijinks we should be alright). Still, while I’m feeling a bit cautious, there’s a lot to like about this premiere, and I’m willing to take a gamble on it

Rating: Great

 

Fuuka

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Synopsis: New meetings always come suddenly! The protagonist, Yuu Haruna, moves into a new town where he meets a somewhat strange girl who doesn’t have a cell phone. The girl, Fuuka, seems to have a strange allure that draws people to her, very much like a summer breeze. Looks like Yuu has been caught up in one wild love story!

First Impressions: So full confession here: I’ve actually read a fair chunk of the manga for this one (mostly as a result of boredom on a quite morning off), so I came into this pretty aware of what it currently is and where it’s inevitably heading. What it currently is, is a fairly by-the-numbers fanservice romance show, with almost all of the usual tropes that implies, meaning that whether or not you can get through these first two episodes (they must really be a hurry to get to the actual show) depends on your tolerance for that sort of thing. Where it’s headed though is a bit more…interesting to say the least, and given that this is a series made by the same guy behind the polarizing romance shows Suzuka and A Town Where You Live, it’ll certainly be something to see the reactions when it gets there. As such I’m more or less in it for that reason as weird as it sounds, and while I normally don’t like to be this coy about things, saying anymore would probably hamper the experience for better or worse. At any rate I’m pretty much on board this train till we get to “twist” but as for anyone else, I guess it’s up to your level of curiosity

Rating: Just Here For The Twist

 

Schoolgirl Strikers: Animation Channel

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Synopsis: Goryoukan Academy is a new private senior/junior high school for girls with a vast downtown campus. This highly popular school has “another face” — a secret hidden side. It organizes and trains the special unit Fifth Force to protect the world from invisible supernatural entities known as “Oburi” that are devouring the world. A team of five trained with powers against the Oburi is to be chosen from the student body to perform missions. A new team leader has been appointed to assemble the five students.

First Impressions: Well I wasn’t really expecting too much out of this one as I came into it mostly expecting it to be something of a fanservice/action show hyrid. What I got instead was something more akin to a gender reversed version of last season’s Touken Ranbu: Hanamaru where it’s a cute girls doing cute things type deal with some action stuff mixed in and a generic fantasy plot. Unforunently the former is 100% not my thing under most circumstances, and the latter didn’t offer nearly enough background details or anything else of interest to compensate. This left me feeling rather bored throughout and ultimately just waiting for the episode to end. As a positive it has some rock-solid production values, from it’s animation to it’s camerawork, and the few bits of action we do get look pretty cool, but sadly it doesn’t change the fact that there wasn’t really anything here of substance for me, and while I imagine this show’ll probably have it’s audience, I probably wouldn’t rank among them.

Rating: Bad

 

Seiren

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Synopsis: Shoichi Kamita is an ordinary high school boy, who is faced with the university entrance exam and worried about his future. This campus romantic comedy, “Seiren”, which means honest in Japanese, depicts his pure relationship with three different heroines. Each story is the unique and mutual memory between him and the heroine.

First Impressions: It’s been a while since I’ve heard of one of these alternate universe rom-com stories, featuring a protagonist romancing a different girl across several different takes, but I’ve always found the idea to be potentially interesting. Still I’d be lying if I said I had any high expectations and what we got in this first episode is more or less what I expected. Everything here is fairly light from the writing to the minimal fanservice, which means it’s more or less accessible to audiences of both genders and seems relatively harmless, but also not terribly interesting. Depending on how far it takes each individual story it’s possible at least one could amount to something notable but for now my expectations aren’t too high and I don’t see too much indication that it’ll rise above  being fluffy genre fare. Compared to Fuuka, though this at least feels a bit less rote, and all of it was inoffensive enough that I could maybe see myself tuning for more if my schedule isn’t swamped for this season (which doesn’t seem too likely for the moment).

Rating: Decent

 

Interviews with Monster Girls

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Synopsis: Monsters of legend walk among us, going by the name “demi-humans.” Ever since he’s discovered the “demis,” one young man has become obsessed with them. So when he gets a job as a teacher at a high school for demi-girls, it’s a dream come true! But these demis, who include a rambunctious vampire, a bashful headless girl, and a succubus, have all the problems normal teenagers have, on top of their supernatural conditions. How to handle a classroom full of them?!

First Impressions: Monster girls are a tired enough premise from anime at this point, that I usually try to ignore them unless there’s something else that sticks out. However, Summer 2015’s Monster Musume turned out to be a lot of fun, despite it’s over the top nature, and it managed to make me feel a bit more open about what could be done with them. All that said, this is about as far south of that show as you can get, as instead of being a crazy fanservice harem show, this is much more of a chill slice-of-life thing that happens to be centered around monster girls. These kinds of shows can be a bit hit or miss for me, but I really liked this one as the girls all feel pretty endearing so far, and it’s kind of refreshing having an adult protagonist for this kind of story. While a lot of the show’s premise seems like it could easily veer into harem show territory, everything here seems perfectly harmless, and the relationship between the protagonist and his monster girl students manages to avoid any serious suggestions of future creepiness. It’s brief pokes at general monster lore are also pretty nice, if not particularly notable, and between that and the rest of it’s atmosphere it looks like it’ll be a nice thing to watch on quiet Saturday afternoons. I’m in.

Rating: Good