Astra Lost in Space Episode #10 Review

Synopsis: On a trip to another planet for a school sanctioned camp experience, a group of nine kids suddenly finds themselves transported 5,000 light years away with little hope of survival. Their only chance of making it back home lies in an abandoned ship known as the Astra, which was found floating near where they warped. Now this group of strangers will have to come together, and make a journey across several planets in order to safely make it back home

The Review

Astra might be heading into its home stretch, but the show certainly isn’t slowing down because the mysteries just keep on coming. At this point, the extent to which the show is able to one-up itself with dense plot twists is kind of impressive in and of itself, and this episode’s showings really take the cake in that area, as we not only deal with last week’s giant cliffhanger, but the long awaited answer of who the traitor among the kids is. Unlike with last week’s shenanigans, this doesn’t quite leave enough room for any of the show’s trademark character drama, but what we do get here certainly helps in setting up this show’s endgame, and it’s looking like it could be a whole lot bigger than expected.

Jumping right into what was established with last week’s bombshell, the kids are from a planet called Astra while Polina is from the Earth we all know. Kanata briefly suggests the idea that she could be an alien (by their point of view), but that theory doesn’t hold much water. She definitely speaks the same language they do, and when Polina brings up that she was originally from Russia, Aries has at least heard of Russia, even if the very concept of countries (and religion by the looks of things since none of the kids have ever heard of “God” before) is considered outdated by Planet Astra. After Polina and the kids compare their worlds’ timelines side-by-side it seems as though history on Earth and history on Astra are roughly similar until about 1963. While we had the Cuban Missile Crisis that threatened to cause World War III, Astra actually did experience WWIII, and the devastation was so massive that humanity gave up on the concept of war entirely and formed one unified world government, with countries and guns being abolished.

Meanwhile in Polina’s timeline, which is presumably the same as ours, around 2049, it was projected that an asteroid would destroy the Earth in eight years. Humanity then began a mass exodus plan to search for a new world using several ships, among which the Astra was one of them. This was done via artificial wormhole technology which was likely the same as the sphere used to warp the kids into space to begin with, and the icy planet where the kids first came across the Astra was likely the ravaged planet Earth after the asteroid hit. However on Astra, the year 2057 has already passed, and while Polina concludes that it’s likely Astra was one of the planets that the Earth colonized, the fact that it seems to have put together such an organized civilization in a just a few years is more than a little bizarre.

Woof. If that all seems pretty dense and confusing to you, rest assured that the actual explanation is even more complicated than my summary, and even with Astra technically being a sci-fi anime, this is still a lot to take in. Long story short though, it’s almost certain that the kids and the other citizens of planet Astra are descended from humanity on Earth, but the question remains of why Astra has such a convoluted timeline to begin with, and why the kids have no knowledge of the threat that caused humanity to vacate Earth in the first place. As Ulgar aptly puts it, “the adults are always hiding something” and given that the citizens of Astra seem to have been carefully educated not to dig too much into history, it’s likely that some other catastrophe happened that the world government decided to cover up.

Whatever it is they’re hiding is anyone’s guess at this point, and given that we only have two more episodes to address it, I imagine we’ll learn about it sooner rather than later. Regardless of what the truth might be though, one thing I can say for sure is that I once again have to give the show some serious props for its foreshadowing. As ridiculously complex as this whole twist is (I mean seriously, just look at it), the show’s dropped more than enough hints here and there that it all still feels like it makes sense, and that the show is rewarding your patience. Granted it still feels like there’s more questions than answers here, but this is all fascinating enough that seeing where this will all lead still feels exciting (even if I do know the answer already).

But while there’s plenty to chew on with that, the show still has other mysteries to address as it’s finally to end the game of “spot the traitor” that’s been building over it’s run. As the crew heads towards the final planet, Kanata goes what happened when they all got launched through the wormhole, and asks Aries to do a favor for him
(as well as offering to walk her home when this is all over, which might be his indirect way of asking her out, but it’s hard to tell with how dense he generally is) and identify who was the last person to get sucked through the wormhole since they’re probably the traitor. Thanks to that ,he deduces the traitor is none other than Ulgar and comes up with a masterful plan to catch him in the ac- alright let’s not kind ourselves here folks. The traitor is actually *surprise* Charice, and Kanata’s “plan” to catch Ulgar was really just his way of getting Charice to slip up and reveal that he’s been carrying the artificial wormhole that’s been following them around this whole time.

As impressive as many of this show’s mysteries and revelations have been up until now, Charice being the traitor was almost ridiculously obvious in comparison. Even putting aside how overly melodramatic his “backstory” was compared to everyone else’s and that it had nothing to do with this show’s consistent theme of bad parenting, neither his folks or Aries’s mom showed up to last week’s League of Extraordinarily Evil Parents meeting. This left either him or Aries as potential traitor suspects and as wacky of a twist as Aries being the traitor might have been, we’ve seen way too many of her thoughts for that to be plausible, so it only left our favorite blond. Luckily if you were a little underwhelmed by how obvious this answer was (I would be, but again, it just demonstrates that this show actually understands good foreshadowing with mysteries) the truth behind his reasoning might actually be the bigger twist here. Like the others, he’s a clone, and he was dispatched to make sure the others were dead before dying himself. Specifically though, he’s a clone of Noah Vix, the king of the Vixia Royal Quarter.

Given that the girl from Charice’s fake backstory seemed to be real, it’s interesting, but not super surprising that he at least wasn’t lying about where he was from. However, this just raises more questions. While all of the kids “parents” have been shown to be influential members of society in some way, throwing an actual king into the mix changes up the dynamic behind this conspiracy considerably, and begs a few questions. Mainly, why he’d risk getting involved in a plan like this to begin with, as well as whether or not he had his own agenda in doing so. It’s quite a lot to think about. Heck this whole episode is a lot to think about, so it should certainly be fun to see how the show hopes to answer all the new questions its raised with the two remaining episodes it has left. Of course, if what went down here is any indication, this show’s story seems more than well thought out enough that there’s hardly any room to doubt those answers won’t be satisfying.

Rating: 8.3/10

Available on Funimation

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